Dr Helen Moore

Her research and teaching interests interrogate the boundaries of cultures, periods and disciplines. She supervises graduates in both the medieval and early modern periods, and much of her recent research is concerned with the reception in English of continental and classical texts (specifically romance). The groundwork for her interdisciplinary research has been laid by bringing neglected texts back to academic attention, and to that end she has published two scholarly editions (of the sixteenth-century prose romance Amadis de Gaule(2004) and the seventeenth-century play Guy of Warwick (2007)). At the same time she has been working on a book about the English reception of Amadis from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries (for which she received a period of AHRC-funded leave), and has contributed to various multi-volume works on translation, reception and the early modern period; current writing commitments in the same vein embrace the novel and the history of English prose. Other research interests and publications include the interlocking literary cultures of early modern England and France, early modern drama (especially Jonson, Dekker, Webster, Munday and Shakespeare), prose fiction, Sidney, and medieval romance. With Philip Hardie of the Classics Faculty in Cambridge (a former Corpus colleague), she edited Classical Literary Careers and their Reception (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Dr Moore has co-organised with Corpus classical colleagues two interdisciplinary conferences (the Passmore Edwards symposia) on the topics of ekphrasis and literary careers. She chaired the curatorial committee of the 2011 Bodleian Libraries summer exhibition, Manifold Greatness: Oxford and the Making of the King James Bible, marking the 400th anniversary of the translation of the King James Bible, and with Corpus archivist Julian Reid edited the accompanying book, Manifold Greatness: The Making of the King James Bible (Bodleian Library Publications, 2011).

For the Faculty of English Helen lectures in medieval and early modern subjects at undergraduate and graduate level, and has supervised M.St. and D.Phil. theses on medieval and sixteenth-century romance, Anglo-Spanish literary relations, Sir Thomas Wyatt, early Tudor literature and drama, and Elizabethan drama and prose fiction.

Helen Moore teaches medieval and early modern literature, and is a Fellow of Corpus Christi College. Her teaching and research interests typically interrogate the boundaries of cultures, periods and disciplines. She supervises graduates in both the medieval and early modern periods, and much of her recent research is concerned with the reception in English of continental and classical texts (specifically romance). The groundwork for her interdisciplinary research has been laid by bringing neglected texts back to academic attention, and to that end she has published two scholarly editions (of the sixteenth-century prose romance Amadis de Gaule (2004) and the seventeenth-century play Guy of Warwick (2007)). She has written a book-length study of the English reception of Amadis from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries (for which she received a period of AHRC funding), and is now turning her attention to a book on the literary cultures and traditions linking early modern England and France. Other research interests include early modern drama (especially Jonson, Dekker, Webster, Munday and Shakespeare), prose fiction, Sidney, and medieval romance.

With Philip Hardie of the Classics Faculty in Cambridge she edited Classical Literary Careers and their Reception(Cambridge University Press, 2010). Dr Moore has co-organised with Corpus classical colleagues two interdisciplinary conferences (the Passmore Edwards symposia) on the topics of ekphrasis and literary careers.  She chaired the curatorial committee of the 2011 Bodleian Libraries summer exhibition, Manifold Greatness: Oxford and the Making of the King James Bible, marking the 400th anniversary of the translation of the King James Bible, and with Julian Reid edited the accompanying book, Manifold Greatness: The Making of the King James Bible (Bodleian Library Publications, 2011).

Publications

  • A Tale of Two Bibles: King James and Geneva after 1611

  • Dramatising Heliodorus

  • Paper

  • 'Romance' in Oxford Bibliographies Online

  • Admirable Inventions: Francis Kirkman and the Translation of Romance in the 1650s

  • More
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